A pair of painted sheet Médicis vases

A PAIR OF PAINTED SHEET MEDICIS VASES, DECORATED WITH A FINE GILD ENGRAVED BRONZE, RESTING ON “TROMPE L’OEIL” BASE.

 

 

 

 

 

France

18th Century

 

 

Measurements:

 

Height: 18” ½ in

Width: 12” ¼ in

 

 

 

Our pair of Médicis vases is made out of painted sheet. This technique, invented in Italy in 1740 and introduced in France in 1763, was a great success. This one indeed makes it possible to compete with lacquer, fragile material, prone to cracks when it is stuck on a wood frame.  Thus many objects were realized, such as bottle or glass buckets, torches,vases, but also of the small pieces of furniture.

The painted sheet is a sheet of iron rolled, coated a light thickness of tin and covered then with two to four layers of varnished polished. the decoration is applied in this base.

The diffusion of sheet starting from the middle of the century allowed a certain number of interesting creations. This woolly steel or iron sheet was naturally more convenient to work and could adapt to more complex forms.

The other interest of sheet was to varnish it so that it competes with the Martin varnish for the imitation of the lacquers. Thus, two specialized manufactures, the manufacture of la veuve Gosse et Samousseau and that known as of “la Petite Pologne » of Jean-Henri Clement (1769), were founded in Paris at the end of the 1760’s to ensure a Parisian production versus many British creations.

Painted, the sheet tried to compete with the hard porcelain and stones, like our pair of Médicis vases.